Narahari Cakravarti Thakura


    Sri Narahari Cakravarti Thakura appeared in the late 1600's in West Bengal in a brahmana family. Jagannatha Vipra, his father, was a famous disciple of Sripad Visvanatha Cakravarti Thakura. Narahari ( Ghanasyama Dasa) was a disciple of Nrsimha Cak­ravarti in the line of Srinvasa Acarya.

    From youth Narahari observed a vow of celibacy. All his ac­tivities were pure and saintly. He was always meek and humble, thinking himself a mischievous rascal. He used to say, "I am unfit for serving the Lord. I have no qualifications at all." Yet he was extremely learned in the arts of dancing, singing, playing musical instruments. He knew the intricate science of using the musical arts to praise the Lord and His associates.

    He was well-versed in the bhakti-sastras and in performing various kinds of devotional service. Being personally chosen by the Lord, Narahari became Radha-Govindaji's favorite cook in Vrndavana. He was known as rasuya pujari (the expert cook-priest) for mastering the art of making palatable dishes for the Lord. Wherever he traveled he established real religious principles.

    Fulfilling the desire of his father and the Supreme Lord, Narahari spent most of his life in the humble service of Govindaji. He ground sandalwood pulp, collected fire wood, cleaned the temple courtyard, picked tulasi leaves and manjaris, fanned Lord Govindaji from outside by pulling a rope.

    Out of genuine humility he always kept himself at a distance. He did the service of ten men. The temple pujaris would plead with him not to do such lowly service. Insisting, Narahari said, "I am most fallen. I have no right. It is really merciful of you all to let me render whatever service I can." Narahari passed his days deep­ly absorbed in devotional service. He would always show respect to everyone he met. Seeing Narahari's behavior, the Vrajavasis always spoke about his good qualities.

    Narahari Cakravarti Thakura was always satisfied to remain in the humble service of Govindaji. He cooked for the Lord well into his seventies. He simultaneously wrote many books about the Gosvamis and the lives of the Gaudiya Acaryas such as Narottama-vilasa and others.