Satapatha-Brâhmana, Part 50

BY: SUN STAFF - 4.6 2018

A serial presentation of the Satapatha Brahmana, translated by Julius Eggeling in 1882.

 

First Kânda - The Darsapûrnamâsa-Ishtî or New And Full-Moon Sacrifices

Eighth Adhyâya – First Brâhmana, Part Two

1:8:1:16 - 16. At that time, namely, Manu became apprehensive (thinking), 'This (part) of my sacrifice--that is, this idâ representing the domestic offering--is certainly the weakest: the Rakshas must not injure my sacrifice at this place.' Accordingly by that (butter, taken from the idâ, and smeared on his lips) he promoted it (the idâ to a safe place, thinking), 'Before the Rakshas (come)! before the Rakshas (come)!'

And in like manner this one also thereby promotes (the idâ to a safe place, thinking), 'Before the Rakshas (come)! before the Rakshas (come)!' And though he does not (at present) eat (the idâ) visibly, lest he should eat it before it is invoked, he nevertheless promotes it (to a safe place), when he smears the (butter) on his lips.

1:8:1:17 - 17. He now cuts off piece by piece (the avântaredâ) in (or, into) the Hotri's hand. That which is cut up piece by piece he thus makes visibly enter [1] the Hotri; and through that which has entered (or is cooked in) his own self, the Hotri invokes a blessing on the sacrificer: for this reason he cuts it off piece by piece in the Hotri's hand [2].

1:8:1:18 - 18. He now calls [3] (the idâ) in a low voice. At that time, namely, Manu became apprehensive (thinking), 'This (part) of my sacrifice--that is, this idâ representing the domestic offerings--is certainly the weakest: the Rakshas must not injure my sacrifice at this place.' He accordingly called it to him in a low voice (thinking), 'Before the Rakshas (come)! before the Rakshas (come)!' And in like manner this one (the Hotri) thereby calls it (thinking), 'Before the Rakshas (come)! before the Rakshas (come)!'

1:8:1:19 - 19. He calls thus (in a low voice) [1], 'Hither is called the Rathantara (chant), together with the earth: may the Rathantara, together with the earth, call me [2]! Hither is called the Vâmadevya (chant), together with the atmosphere: may the Vâmadevya, together with the atmosphere, call me! Hither is called the Brihat (chant), together with the sky: may the Brihat, together with the sky, call me!' In thus calling her (the Idâ) to him, he calls to him both these (three) worlds and those chants [3].

1:8:1:20 - 20. 'Hither are called the cows [4], together with the bull!'--the idâ, assuredly, means cattle: hence it is her he thereby calls in an indirect (mystic) way; (and in saying), 'together with the bull,' he calls her together with her mate.

1:8:1:21 - 21. 'Hither is called (Idâ) by that (sacrifice) which is performed by the seven Hotris!'--he thereby calls her by the Soma-sacrifice performed by the seven Hotris [1].

1:8:1:22 - 22. 'Hither is called Idâ, the conquering!'--he thereby calls her directly. 'Conquering' he says, because she overcomes evil, and for that reason he calls her 'the conquering.'

1:8:1:23 - 23. 'Hither is called the friend, the food [2]!'--the friend, the food, doubtless, means breath: hence he thereby calls hither the breath. 'Hither is called the Hek [3]!'--he thereby calls hither the (body of idâ), he thereby calls hither the entire (idâ).

1:8:1:24 - 24. He now intones (in a loud voice): 'Idâ is called hither! Hither (thither) is called Idâ! May Idâ also call us to her!' In saying, 'Idâ is called hither,' he, in a direct way, calls her, who is thereby called hither, as being what she really was: a cow, assuredly, she was, and a cow is four-footed; and therefore he calls her four times [1].

1:8:1:25 - 25. But in calling her four times, he calls her in different ways, in order to avoid repetition (of sacrificial performance); for, if he were to call, 'Idâ is called hither! Idâ is called hither!' or 'Hither is called Ida! hither is called Idâ!' he would indeed commit the (fault of) repetition. By saying, 'Idâ is called hither!' he calls her hitherwards; and by 'Hither (or thither, lit. called to somebody) is called Idâ!' he calls her thitherwards. By saying, 'May Idâ also call us to her,' he does not omit himself, and, besides, it (the formula) is changed. By (the second), 'Idâ is called hither!' he again calls her hitherwards; so that he thereby (and by the second, 'Hither is called Idâ,' again) calls her hitherwards and thitherwards.

1:8:1:26 - 26. 'Manu's daughter, the butter-pathed (ghritapadî);'--Manu, indeed, begat her of old: for this reason he says, 'Manu's daughter.' 'The butter-pathed' he says, because butter gathered in her footprint: therefore he calls her 'butter-pathed.'

1:8:1:27 - 27. And further, 'She who belongs to Mitra and Varuna;'--this 'Maitrâvaruna nature' (is hers), because she met Mitra and Varuna [2].--'She, the god-fashioned one, is called hither as the Brahman [3]; for she, the god-fashioned one, is indeed called hither as their Brahman.--'Hither are called the divine Adhvaryus, called hither the human!'--he thereby calls both the divine Adhvaryus and those that are human: the divine Adhvaryus indeed are the calves [1] (vatsâh), and what others there are, are the human ones.

1:8:1:28 - 28. '--They who are to prosper this sacrifice, they who are to prosper the lord of sacrifice.' Those Brâhmanas, who have studied and teach the Veda, assuredly prosper the sacrifice, since they spread (perform) and produce it: these he thereby propitiates. And the calves also assuredly make the lord of sacrifice prosper; for the lord of sacrifice who possesses abundance of them, does indeed prosper; for this reason he says, 'They who are to prosper the lord of sacrifice.'